Afghanistan Constitutional Reform

In a historic undertaking, Afghanistan will reform its constitution in the next two years.

Afghanistan Constitutional Reform Resources

If Not Now? When

David Steven's new paper aims to accelerate efforts to end all forms of violence against children.

New paper by David Steven

Friend or Foe

In Afghanistan, will China and the U.S. be rivals or partners?

New lecture by Barnett Rubin

CIC on Global Development

CIC staff and fellows comment on how to make global development work

CIC on Global Development

Endgame for ETA

Teresa Whitfield offers a compelling account of ETA’s slow process towards disarmament and dissolution.

New Book by Teresa Whitfield

Annual Review 2013

The most detailed collection of data on global peace operations available.

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations

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Since 2008, energy and food markets—those most fundamental to human existence—have remained in turmoil. Resource scarcity has had a much bigger global impact in recent years than has been predicted, with ongoing volatility a sign that the world is only part-way through navigating a treacherous transition in the way it uses resources. Scarcity, and perceptions of scarcity, increase political risks, while geopolitical turmoil exacerbates shortages and complicates the search for solutions.

The last decade has seen not one but two energy revolutions. The first, explosive growth in demand from Asia’s rising powers, fueled fears about scarcity and conflict. The second, an American revolution in technology and markets, is rapidly strengthening America’s hand in the world. There are major security consequences of these shifts, from Saudi Arabia to Africa to Russia, and the emerging powers are increasingly exposed to them—risks, as well as energy flows, are pivoting to Asia. All while a third revolution is struggling to be born, driven by climate change.

Just over five years ago, relations between the EU and UN were strained due to the difficulties of planning and implementing coordinated missions in Chad and Kosovo. Today, relations are considerably more cordial, but there is still room to improve the two organizations’ joint planning procedures. This paper aims to assess what has been achieved in the field of planning coordination and what the remaining challenges are; it also makes some suggestions for further action.

Nov 13, 2014
Richard Gowan
United Nations

As part of UNICEF UK’s Every Child in Danger campaign, CIC’s David Steven contributed research with an eye toward the political solutions necessary for ending violence against children. In this report, he describes the scale of the epidemic, reviews the likely post-2015 targets that will make a difference in combating violence, and proposes ways forward on the issue, urging political leadership and global partnership above all.

Oct 20, 2014
David Steven
Global Development

In September 2014, the Mission of Mexico to the United Nations, in partnership with the NYU Center on International Cooperation and Saferworld, convened a meeting bringing together representatives from UN member states as well as experts from around the world for an interactive discussion with member states and civil society on peaceful societies and the post-2015 development framework.

Oct 17, 2014
Jeffrey Strew
Global Development

On October 14 through 16, Richard Gowan participated in the Challenges Forum, an annual peacekeeping conference in Beijing. The Challenges Forum is a strategic and dynamic platform for dialogue among policymakers, practitioners and academics on key issues and developments in peace operations. The aim is to shape the debate by promoting awareness of emerging issues and identifying key challenges facing military, police and civilian peace operations.

Oct 14, 2014
Richard Gowan
China, Europe
Peace Operations

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Programs in Focus

  • India and the Multilateral Order

    The five major emerging economies – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) – have gained on the world stage and their presence is being felt in every multilateral institution. Among them India – the world’s largest democracy with a burgeoning economy and a long history of engagement with the multilateral order – is of special significance. For BRICS watchers in general and anyone interested in the future of India in particular, twenty-two scholars of international repute have produced one of the most comprehensive volumes on India’s role in the evolving global order: Shaping the Emerging World.

  • Trilateral Dialogues

    On March 11-12, 2014, CIC and the Chinese Institute of International Studies (CIIS) co-hosted two trilateral discussions, the US-China-Afghanistan Dialogue and the US-China-Pakistan Dialogue. CIC Director Dr. Barnett Rubin and CIIS's Qu Xing and Dong Manyuan chaired the event, which brought together a group of nearly 30 scholars, US officials, and former officials from the four countries for candid, in-depth discussions on approaches to the upcoming transition in Afghanistan.

    The trilateral meetings followed three previous sessions of a US-China bilateral dialogue that began in July 2012.

  • Pathways to Security Council Reform

    Member states are increasingly looking to 2015 as a milestone for progress on United Nations Security Council reform. 2015 marks the seventieth anniversary of the UN, fifty years since the implementation of the last (and only) Council enlargement, and ten years since the 2005 World Summit. This paper provides an overview of the current context, an explanation of global perspectives on UNSC reform, and analysis of discussions on UNSC reform in and around the African Union. CIC’s recommendations outline a number of potential practical steps that can be taken to help facilitate tangible progress by 2015.

  • United Nations Development at a Crossroads

    The UN development system stands at a crossroads. It can either embrace the deep reform required to remain relevant to development in today’s global economy, or face the prospect of continued marginalization. The path chosen at this fork in the road depends on the commitment of all relevant actors – UN agencies and governments – as well as strong leadership: from governments, from within the UN development system, and from the Secretary-General.

     

  • Sustainable Development Goals

    Recent months have seen increasing interest in the idea that Rio+20 could be the launch pad for a new set of ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ (SDGs).  But what would SDGs cover, what would a process to define and then implement them look like, and what would some of the key political challenges be? This short briefing sets out a short summary of current thinking on the issue, followed by thoughts about the way forward.