The Libyan crisis demonstrated the divisions over interventionism that surfaced around the 2003 Iraq invasion remain unresolved. The dividing lines over Libya differed from those over Iraq, with France now advocating interventionism. Yet it was clear that there was still no EU consensus on the criteria for the use of force. This breakdown -- highlighted by Germany's refusal to vote military action at the UN -- raises questions about what the European powers learned from Iraq.

Jan 23, 2012
Richard Gowan
Middle East
Crises

Managing Global Order : Challenges to international order and governance 

Archived Program

The Managing Global Order program (MGO) - joint with the Brookings Institution and the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) at Stanford University - maps the changing global order; identifies key gaps in the provision of global order functions and multilateral governance arrangements; and facilitates policy dialogue between the established and emerging powers to fill those gaps. MGO produces independent research and policy recommendations for U.S. and international policy makers, and convenes high-level, informal sessions between the United States and the emerging powers.